Parenting My Teen

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Cure the Back To School Blues

By: Aurelia Category: Family, Parenting A Teen, Teen Education

Do you remember when you were in school?  You could hardly wait for the school year to end and summer vacation to begin.  The closer a new school year came, the more you had back to school blues.   Now it seems as if the summer months fly by and the summer break seems to get shorter and shorter.   Your children probably feel the same way as the new school year is drawing near.

What can parents do to help with their children’s back to school blues?  Here are some ideas of how to help your child prepare for the new school year that’s just around the corner.

1.  A couple of weeks before school starts, begin to get them back on a “school night” schedule.  Whatever schedule works for your family (in bed by 8 p.m. and up by 7 a.m., in bed by 9 p.m. and up by 7 a.m., etc.), begin to implement it in increments to get them used to going to bed earlier and getting up earlier for the school day.

2.  Listen to your child’s concerns.  Think about how you felt when you had to return to school.  Acknowledge their fears when they first happen; don’t push them aside.  Then talk things over with your child; tell them a story about when you were a child in the same situation.

3.  If you’re allowed, go to the school a couple of days or weeks before school starts.  Take your child on a tour of the different classrooms or areas in the school that they’ll spend time in.  Meet the teacher if they’re available.  Be sure to take them by the lunchroom, library, office, school nurse’s office (if there is one), and most importantly, the restrooms.

4.  Have a “dry run” for getting ready each day for a few days before the first day of school.  Plan to set everything out the night before just as they will be during the school year, and then have your child get dressed and ready to leave to see how things will work.  This will also allow you to see if there are some areas of the morning routine that need to be tweaked to work better.

5.  Create a special place for your child to do homework and leave their backpack so needed items are less likely to be lost.  You may want to create a routine where you go through your child’s backpack with them each night, gathering any papers that need to be signed, assignments they need to do, and jot down any important dates on the family calendar.

6.  Have a back to school blues-buster party.  The night before school starts, plan a special meal, watch a favorite movie on DVD, and plan a back to school blues-buster dessert.  Choose whatever will cheer up your child and give them a good feeling about the first day of school.

Your child is not the only one in the world to deal with back to school blues.  It helps to talk things over, be prepared, and then celebrate the new beginning.  You might find that you’re able to handle your own back to school blues better, too.

Also be sure to grab your copy of Real Life Guidance to Helping Your Teen With High School.  This offers parenting help and shows you how to help your teen deal with the pressures of high school and also help them to be more independent!

Back to School: Keeping your Teen Safe

By: Mary Lutz Category: Parenting A Teen, Teen Dating & Sex

Safety is always in the back of our minds when it comes to our children no matter what age they are. When it comes to our teenagers, the issue of safety becomes a whole different scenario than when our kids were younger. Teenagers are gaining their independence and beginning to explore their world more, which includes the opposite sex, driving, parties, friendships, education and entertainment such as the internet, TV, video games and movies. As our teens head back to school this fall, here are some tips to help ensure your teen’s safety as they explore these different areas of life.

Driving

This is probably one of the major areas of concern most parents of teens have when it comes to safety. Once your teen has their driver’s license, they’ve just gained a whole new level of independence. The best way to ensure your teen’s safety while driving is to set some boundaries, rules and guidelines for them.

Boundaries: when they first start driving solo, allow them to drive only certain distances, or on certain roads and establish driving hours (i.e. they can’t drive past 10PM). Increase the boundary lines as you see they are responsible for maintaining those boundaries and not abusing them.

Rules must be established before your teen is allowed to take the car out for the first time alone. Rules include the obvious such as obeying the laws of the road, but should also include: no friends allowed in the car for the first month or whatever you feel is appropriate for your teen; no talking on the cell phone while driving and absolutely NO texting while driving.

You will want to establish some guidelines with your teen before sending them off in the car alone to school such as no boyfriends or girlfriends in the car, driving straight to school and home or to practice only, homework must be done first before going anywhere else as well as sensible gas usage.

Here is another great article on teen driving safety.

Since we’ve touched on the topic of the opposite sex, let’s talk about that next.

Opposite Sex

As girls and boys begin to approach their teen years, they become more and more interested in the opposite sex. No longer do boys and girls have cooties, instead they find each other cute and interesting. Your young teen has probably had some sort of “health” class where they teach them some things about the opposite sex, however, the best information on the subject of sex should come from you, their parent.

I know how hard it can be to talk about sex and the opposite sex with your teen, but just be open and honest with your child. Tell him or her about your first crush and your experiences with the opposite sex.

If you believe in abstinence, begin teaching it to your child as soon as possible and lay down the rules to help them abstain: no couples only dating meaning they can go out in large groups and with other friends who will help hold them accountable; encouraging them to hang out with family and spending time doing family activities; encourage your teen to date only those of the opposite sex that have the same beliefs as you.

If you feel abstinence is not for you or your teen, then by all means give your teen the protection they need to guard against STD’s and pregnancy.

For further help and information on this subject read Teaching Your Teen to Say No.

Your teen wants you to protect them whether they realize it or not. By establishing rules, boundaries and guidelines with them before sending them off to school, you will help ensure their safety and they will know deep in their soul that you love them.

As a parent of a teen you might be interested in a program called Parenting Your Teen: It teaches you How To Handle Your Teenager And All Situations Involving Him Or Her In A True “WIN-WIN” Manner And Develop The Co-Operative, Down-To-Earth, Frustration-Free Relationship That You’ve Always Wanted.

Easing Back to School Stress – Show #47

By: Aurelia Category: Parenting My Teen Podcast

Thanks for joining us as we celebrate the 3rd Anniversary of Parenting My Teen!

School is starting again very soon – or maybe your classes have already begun – and there is always some stress associated with going back to school, no matter what grade your teen is entering.

My guest this week is a long time PMT Friend, Marie Ynami of Mommy Community.com Marie is a work at home mom of 3 from California. This school year, her youngest is in middle school, she has a high school senior and a teen that just graduated from high school.

In this episode we discuss tips for getting our teens back into the school mindset after a summer of fun as well as:

– when to meet the teachers;
– how to keep lines of communication open about your expectations during the school year and your child’s concerns;
– setting routines & limits;
– encouraging your child to get involved in activities.

If you need even more tips for helping your teen deal with the tribulations of high school, take a look at my ebook, Real Life Guidance to Helping Your Teen In High School. This guide shows you how you can allow your teen to have some independence while providing support and guidance to them as they make their way through high school, and the best part is that you can get started right now!

Teens After School Activities: Tutoring and Study Groups

By: Mary Lutz Category: Uncategorized

This post is the beginning of a series of topics we will be covering over the next several days. With the new school year right around the corner, our teens will be looking at different after school activities and we want to make sure our teens are involved in activities that will help them grow and be successful. So, if you’re not subscribed to Parenting My Teen yet, why not hit that cute little “subscribe” button up there in the right hand corner so you don’t miss any of the helpful articles from Parenting My Teen. On to today’s post…

The educational system today is in a flux.  Reorganizations are occurring yearly in an attempt to better educate students.  Overcrowding and lack of good instruction makes it even harder on students to achieve.

In order for students to achieve at the basic level of understanding and comprehending the subjects at hand, students can tutor those who need assistance.  Moreover, study groups, while very common in high school and college, can also be utilized in the middle schools as well.  It is estimated that the most important school years for any student is from 5th to 8th grade.
While reports increasingly state that the reading and math scores of students are on the decline, especially in high school, it is clearly evident that additional support has to become available for elementary and middle school students.
Tutoring and study groups can make all the difference.  Studying with one’s own peers makes it easier for students to grasp the subject area and make strides to improve on school exams, and city and state tests.  While there are certainly teachers who offer their services, as well as Dial a Teacher which is available in most states, it is the one on one or group study that is most successful and effective.
More importantly, students who need help in a certain subject feel more comfortable with a tutor.  In this way, it is done in the privacy of their home where the environment is safe and comfortable.  Moreover, some students may become embarrassed at the thought of anyone knowing they are being tutored.
Conversely, study groups in middle school and high school can produce students who take lead in establishing study groups in college.  Networking with other students is one of the most important resources currently utilized in college, and it is a result of study groups formed by students who felt the need to embrace this type of educational tool.

The educational system today is in a flux. Reorganizations are occurring yearly in an attempt to better educate students. Overcrowding and lack of good instruction makes it even harder on students to achieve.

In order for students to achieve at the basic level of understanding and comprehending the subjects at hand, students can tutor those who need assistance. Moreover, study groups, while very common in high school and college, can also be utilized in the middle schools as well. It is estimated that the most important school years for any student is from 5th to 8th grade.

While reports increasingly state that the reading and math scores of students are on the decline, especially in high school, it is clearly evident that additional support has to become available for elementary and middle school students.

Tutoring and study groups can make all the difference. Studying with one’s own peers makes it easier for students to grasp the subject matter and make strides to improve on school exams, and city and state tests. While there are certainly teachers who offer their services, as well as Dial a Teacher which is available in most states, it is the one on one or group study that is most successful and effective.

More importantly, students who need help in a certain subject feel more comfortable with a tutor. In this way, it is done in the privacy of their home where the environment is safe and comfortable. Moreover, some students may become embarrassed at the thought of anyone knowing they are being tutored.

Conversely, study groups in middle school and high school can produce students who take lead in establishing study groups in college. Networking with other students is one of the most important resources currently utilized in college, and it is a result of study groups formed by students who felt the need to embrace this type of educational tool.

For more great tips on helping your teen through high school, get Helping your Teen Through High School. from Life Coach, Aurelia Williams.


Back to School Teens – High School Homework: The Time, They are a Changing

By: Mary Lutz Category: Parenting A Teen, Teen Education

Homework sure has changed since we went to high school. Algebra has now advanced to geometry and calculus, science now encompasses advanced physics, and while English embodies the study of famous writers, poets, and the classics – the leap from middle school to high school is akin to jumping over the 6 foot high bar in the Olympics.

The educational system in this country has changed dramatically. Its curriculum has not only advanced, but requires a tough and rigid standard in developing good study habits, the ability to research information, writing term papers and reports, and adhering to the standard of excellence most high schools require.

The need for such strict study habits and discipline in following a specific curriculum is to prepare a student for college and the workplace thereafter. The current salary for a student who graduates from college with a degree in technology or business is approximately $100,000.

While high school homework may be difficult for some, others who were good students in middle school and followed a methodology which enhanced their study and homework habits, the transition is much smoother than for those who “goofed off” and didn’t pay attention in school.

Conversely, while some students think the rigid learning process is somewhat alleviated in high school, they have quite a surprise waiting for them. It is in high school that a student can add to all of his former accomplishments by joining in-school clubs, tutoring fellow students, becoming a member of the school newspaper, applying for advanced courses in college, community volunteering, earning credit by taking extra courses, and becoming totally involved and immersed in the educational process. This will give them quite a resume to present to their college of choice.

High school homework should be tougher because no one is given a free pass. The world is tougher now then it was when we attended high school, and students need to have the discipline and fortitude to withstand anything that is thrown at them. They are the future caretakers of this planet, and every student should work hard in order to contribute their expertise in whatever endeavor they choose.

High school is but another chain in the link which, when advancing to college, can be clasped with pride and achievement. High school homework, while it may seem tedious and irrelevant now, is the key to a successful future for any student who aims high and wishes to grab the brass ring of success.

If you would like further information to help your teen through the high school years, check out the following guide written by life coach Aurelia Williams.


Additional Resource:

Student Mind Power – The High School Student’s Guide To Great Grades will show your teenager how to use the untapped potential of their mind to create outstanding academic results, develop massive self-confidence and set down a path towards a limitless life.